The Best Way to Clean an Area Rug

The Best Way to Clean an Area Rug

I want to show the most effective way I have found to clean area rugs and the good news is

  1. It is FREE!
  2. It will last at least a year, even with heavy traffic.

Step by step tutorial on effective DIY rug cleaning process!

Step by step tutorial on effective DIY rug cleaning process!

If you have ever pulled up carpet, you know what I am talking about when I say, it can be horrifying! All the years of dirt and debris get trapped underneath and even if you professionally clean them every six months as suggested, there is just no way to truly get them clean.

Now area rugs are another story because you can get to the underside!

When we first looked at our farmhouse one of our fellow old-home lover friends came to admire the place. The carpet was DISGUSTING, yes, I just yelled that.

There were so many pet stains that I wouldn’t let them kids take their shoes off.  But, once I turned my back they started rolling across the floor. I think I might have flipped out on them at that point.

But, once our friend took out his knife and pulled up the corner of that nasty carpet to reveal original hard wood floors, I caught the vision.

We spent that first fourth of July tearing out that horrible carpet and pulling staples till our hands blistered.

Once the hardwoods were restored, the house was strangely echoey and we set out to find a few area rugs.

This worked well to quiet our house and cleaning hardwoods was much easier than carpets, but I still needed to find a good way to clean the area rugs every so often.

Finally, I settled on the below method. . .

The Best Way to Clean an Area Rug

Step by step tutorial on effective DIY rug cleaning process!

*This post contains affiliate links to products I know &/or love.

  1. Check your weather forecast and make sure you have at least 3 days of sunshine.
  2. Start by giving the rug a good vacuum.
  3. Spot treat any stains.
  4. Roll the rug up and carry outside.
  5. Place on a plastic (preferably) table and unroll it.
  6. Soak the fibers with a garden hose.
  7. Then, using some dish soap and hot water, begin to scrub the rug in sections.
  8. Rinse with the hose water until the water runs clear.
  9. Flip the rug over and repeat.
  10. Let the rug dry for 3 days and place on a clothes line or dry rack on the last day if the rug is small enough.
  11. For maintenance throughout the year, I recommend Kids and Pets for spot treament. It’s been my favorite for the last 16 years and it smells divine.

 

Watch this video to see how easy it is!


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Step by step tutorial on effective DIY rug cleaning process!

If you are focusing on cleaning and decluttering right now, be sure to grab a copy of my simple decluttering method below.  Just click on the printable!

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Step by step tutorial on effective DIY rug cleaning process!

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11 Comments

  1. Chris Ambuehl
    June 10, 2018 / 8:17 AM

    This is terrible advice! Dish soap, laundry detergent has NO PLACE near carpets or rugs. It’s a surefire way to ruin things! I’m a professional carpet cleaner and I deal with this on a daily basis, people ruin their carpets and then say “well I found it on the internet”. Leave the cleaning to the professionals. Your comment about not cleaning the entire rug is a complete lie. Professional cleaners will get your rugs far cleaner than your “garden hose & dish soap method”. The other fact of the matter is that rugs need to be dried immediately to avoid dye bleeding. The way you suggest to sun dry over 3 days is just plain stupid and a definite way to ruin rugs. Slow drying is the direct cause of dye bleeding, not to mention the sun fading the colors. Again, leave the cleaning to the professionals, and if you can’t afford it then you should rethink your rug purchase.

    For goodness sake please stop posting this garbage on the web. You simply don’t know what you’re talking about!

    • Linda
      June 10, 2018 / 1:14 PM

      Chris: would using a wet-dry vac to take up excess water after you rinse an indoor-outdoor rug work?

      • Sarah | She Holds Dearly
        Author
        June 10, 2018 / 4:05 PM

        Linda, if you feel more comfortable using your wet-dry vac then I would use it. Although, I would be surprised if you have much water left on a indoor-outdoor rug.

    • Sarah | She Holds Dearly
      Author
      June 10, 2018 / 4:03 PM

      Hi Chris,

      While I can surely appreciate your passion for your profession and agree with your point on the possibility of colors bleeding, I think you are forgetting few things here.

      1) This is the method I have used for the last ten years on all my rugs with great results.
      2) The decade before that I spent over $2,000 on professional rug cleaners and had less than satisfactory results.
      3) There is no such thing as immediately drying a rug.
      4) The sun is a natural stain remover.
      5) Anytime you can get to both sides of a rug it is going to do a better job than just focusing on one side.
      6) You and I clearly have different audiences, I work with the DIY crowd who has no problem buying used, cleaning things ourselves, switching decor out every few years and doing things like painting rugs. Yes, we take a risk with all these things, but people take risks hiring professionals, as well. It’s all about which risk you are willing to take.

    • Sarah
      June 11, 2018 / 10:03 PM

      Chris,

      You used some harsh words in your comment: “terrible”, “lie”, “stupid” and “garbage”. Really? If you don’t like what is written then don’t read it… you write with passion as though someone is discussing something terribly important… it is a RUG for goodness sake! Not a precious child. The way this world treats children and the unborn… now that is a topic where such comments would be more appropriate. You need to re-evaluate your priorities.
      As far as carpets are concerned… I would much rather have my rugs “bleed” then have my family BREATHING in toxic fumes left from the chemicals used by most “professionals”. These chemicals adhere to carpet fibers and “off-gas” (leach into the air) over time. And no, I did not read that online… I was educated in the university system (Biology) and studied enough chemistry and physiology to understand how damaging these things are to the body and environment. Thankfully, there are some “professionals” who use a totally green cleaning process… unfortunately, they are not in the majority!

  2. Vicki Williams
    June 10, 2018 / 4:31 PM

    I have done the same thing only just put it on my cement patio, ( I have never had a big enough table, which would be great but…got on my hands and knees with a good scrub brush and scrubbed away). Have also use a good stiff broom at times. Rinse, and repeat. Obviously clean the cement first. I live in Arizona so the sun dries pretty fast. Depending on size of rug, a good straight fence is sometimes a good drying rack. It’s good if you can rinse both sides.
    For that matter, back in the day, (I’m 78 now) when my husband and I bought some apartments and found a good 2nd hand wall to wall carpet that is how I cleaned it before we installed it. It was great! A bit of work but I was young then!

    • Sarah | She Holds Dearly
      Author
      June 15, 2018 / 11:33 AM

      This is awesome, Vicki, thanks for waying in! xoxo

  3. Heidi Johnson
    June 13, 2018 / 8:03 PM

    Hi Sarah,
    Are you recommending this method for an all-wool rug as well as cotton and synthetics?
    Thanks for the great information,
    Heidi

    • Sarah | She Holds Dearly
      Author
      June 15, 2018 / 11:42 AM

      So, Heidi, I have used this method on synthetic, wool and jute. Cold water will not hurt wool, but you might want to spot test this method first, if you are nervous. xoxo

  4. August 19, 2018 / 12:03 AM

    For years I’ve cleaned my rugs by using a water hose and liquid detergent! Never had a problem!!! Living in Ga. we have very hot sunny days, my my big, heavy rugs usually dry in one day!

    • Sarah | She Holds Dearly
      Author
      August 23, 2018 / 11:46 AM

      Good for you! I love industrious girls!

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